Thursday, October 20, 2011

Night Walker by Lisa Kessler

Night Walker (The Night, #1)


 Synopsis from Goodreads

He gave up his soul for a second chance to love her...

Two and a half centuries ago, Calisto Terana lost everything when a zealous priest murdered the woman he loved. Now, desperate for another chance to love her, he wants redemption for the mistake that cost her life.

She's haunted by dreams of her own death...

After catching her fiance with another woman, Kate Bradley returns to San Diego to clear her head. The last thing she needs is romance, but after meeting Calisto she's drawn to him in ways she doesn't understand.

They've waited in the shadows for centuries...

Calisto has no doubt Kate is the reincarnation of his lost love, but the Fraternidad Del Fuego Santo has a new watcher with dark ambitions of his own. As old enemies reemerge and a new threat arises, the betrayal that enslaved Calisto to the night might destroy the only woman he's ever loved again.



My rating 2.5 stars

Calisto has waited and yearned for his beloved Tala to return to him, as prophesized more than 250 years ago. Accepting the burden of a horrific curse in a deal that promised him another chance with his one true love, finally Calisto may get the redemption he so desires. However, other forces intend to ensure that Calisto is thwarted fearing he may attempt to create another unnatural creature like himself.

When Kate Bradley arrives in San Diego she is hardly looking for romance. She recently broke her engagement after discovering her fiancé with another woman. Plagued by recurring nightmares, Kate wants some solitude and peace to try to soothe her troubled soul. However, when Kate meets Calisto one evening while meditating an old shrine she is inexplicably drawn to his earnest, old-fashioned manner and almost courtly charm. Unfortunately, her nightmares seem worse than ever.

I had a difficult time connecting with or liking Kate during much of the story. I would start to like her but then she would behave in a completely erratic manner. It also bothered me that Calisto’s home so blatantly seemed to cry out that it was not the abode of a normal person, yet Kate barely questioned the oddities. It seemed all the more bizarre to me because Calisto seems intelligent and worldly but he feels it is unnecessary to keep even a few food items in his kitchen, clothes in his closet, or personal items in his drawers – the rooms may be unused by him but surely he should comprehend the importance of maintaining a better façade for appearances sake. I just could not accept that, and so my suspension of disbelief became lost.

Calisto knew that Kate could very likely be in serious danger, yet he continued to keep secrets from her in the guise of trying to protect her. I got very frustrated with this behavior and several times I just wanted to throttle him. Yet again, the dichotomy between his perceived intelligence and his actions just caused me to shake my head in disbelief.

I wanted to like this novel more than I did. The idea of a man waiting 250 years for the return of his true love really appeals to me. I was put-off though by some of the religious aspects, by Kate’s personality, and by Calisto’s control issues combined with his sometimes singular naivety. I was, however, quite pleasantly surprised by the ending which I really loved.

Reviewed by Laurie-J
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